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Marketing and Communications » marketing.mst.edu » logos » logos
105 Campus Support Facility, 1201 N. State St.  - Phone:  (573) 341-4328  - Email:  marketing@mst.edu  -  YouTube icon   -  Flickr icon 
Missouri S&T graphic marks

Missouri S&T's visual identity is based on a system of official graphic marks, coordinated to help the public easily identify the university and to promote Missouri S&T's distinctive features and visibility among its many important audiences.

Consistent usage is critical. The campus logos must remain as originally drawn and proportioned and cannot be modified or altered in any way. 

 


Missouri S&T signature

The primary graphic element for all Missouri S&T marketing materials, the signature includes the university’s full name. It is to be used when the word mark is not prominent.

The signature features a bold “S&T” to symbolize our emphasis on science and technology. The stylized ampersand features a miner’s pickax that symbolizes our heritage as Missouri School of Mines and the first technological school west of the Mississippi.

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Missouri S&T logo

The Missouri S&T logo, a dominant part of the signature that omits the “University of Science & Technology" logotype (text), should be used when space is limited or when the word mark is prominently featured.


The logo features a bold “S&T" to symbolize our emphasis on science and technology. The stylized ampersand features a miner’s pickax that symbolizes our heritage as Missouri School of Mines and the first technological school west of the Mississippi.

 

To protect the strength and integrity of the university’s brand, departments, student groups or other campus groups may not create a separate logo or wordmark. However, these groups may incorporate their organization's name with the logo. To help ensure a consistent look among campus organizations, please follow these guidelines.


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Joe Miner mascot

Rugged and individualistic, Joe Miner personifies the spirit of the old west and the determination to succeed. His character is closely tied with the school's founding in 1870 as the University of Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. Joe Miner's official pose illustrates a walking stance, with one leg stepping forward. With gun holstered on his hip, Joe swings a pickax while balancing a slide rule across one shoulder. This image was originally hand drawn. 

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Historic emblem

Missouri S&T’s historic emblem includes the following symbols that convey meaning to our alumni and friends:

  • Crossed hammers remind us of our founding as the School of Mines and Metallurgy in 1870
  • The gear, while signifying our historic emphasis in the mechanics of engineering, also challenges all alumni to pursue new ideas and knowledge, accept civic responsibility and serve society.
  • The chain signifies the strong link between MSM, UMR and Missouri S&T graduates.

The historic emblem may be used with marketing materials that are designed to communicate the university’s history or to communicate with alumni. The historic emblem should never be used in place of the Missouri S&T signature, logo or word mark. Its use is reserved for development and alumni relations purposes only.

Use of the historic emblem requires authorization from the communications office. For approval and to request the file, contact communications at comm@mst.edu.


 

Athletics primary mark

Missouri S&T’s athletics primary mark consists of a dominant miner’s pickax behind the abbreviated university name, “Missouri S&T." It is designed with a stylized shadow to illustrate action, as if the symbol is in motion. Both the pickaxe and the name are outlined in white to give two-dimensional depth and create an athletic look.

The athletics primary mark may be used on all athletics materials, including uniforms, equipment and marketing materials.

Use of the athletics primary mark requires authorization from the communications office. For approval and to request the file, contact communications at comm@mst.edu.


Missouri S&T wordmark

The Missouri S&T wordmark spells out Missouri University of Science and Technology as a graphic element. It may be used on its own or in combination with the logo to provide a complete visual image. It should not be used in proximity to the signature.


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